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Didn't answer your question? Feel free to contact us using our online support system here.

If your unit is registered and within its warranty/tech support period, this service is complimentary. However, if your unit is outside its warranty/tech support period, you may incur a $75 charge per inquiry.

You may also choose to contact your dealer for support. If this is the case, a list of dealers is available
here.
Frequently Asked Questions
First, upload (from the ECU to your PC) the pre-loaded calibration map and save a master copy. Your Nemesis device is pre-loaded with this map and it contains vital information about the triggering arrangement and engine setup. You can build upon this map, saving as you go under different filenames.
The Hydra Nemesis defaults on using COM port 1. If you have other software that uses the serial port, it may take a precedent over the Hydra ECU and you may not be able to connect. Your options are to either change your COM port setting if you have more than one COM port, or shut down any conflicting software using the COM port (i.e. Palm Software, OBD2 PC Diagnostic software, etc.)
First, you need to understand how the maps work. There are two types of maps in your Nemesis, the RAM tuned group and the EEPROM based group. The RAM tuned group is all of the Fuel and Spark group maps. EEPROM based group is every other map.

The EEPROM based group is easiest to tune. All you need to do is navigate to the cell you want to tune (using the left and right arrow key), make a change (using the page-up and page-down key) and
THEN HIT ENTER. Note that using the page-up and page-down key only changes the map value on your PC. To make the change take effect in the Nemesis, you must hit the enter key. The EEPROM memory that holds that map cell value is now permanently altered and will be retained if you turn the Nemesis off.

The RAM based group consists of the fuel and spark maps. During a tuning session, it is desirable to make rapid and numerous changes to the map and observe the results. For this reason these maps are buffered in the RAM of the Nemesis. To make a change, just navigate to the cell you want to tune (using the left and right arrow key) and make changes (using the page-up and page-down key).

For the RAM group tuning method to work, it is important to first upload from the Nemesis, and then tune in one continuous session. You
must not turn the nemesis off and then resume tuning, because any changes will be lost. After a complete tuning session, you must save the results of you tuning session on your PC, then download to the Nemesis for a permanent save.

Next time you turn on the Nemesis, the saved map will be again copied to RAM and another tuning session can begin.
PID is a method for controlling many systems such as idle speed, boost and air fuel ratio. The inputs to the Nemesis PID controller are the P, I and D values (set by the user), the target of the system (e.g. 800 rpm from the idle speed target curve) and the feedback of the system (e.g. 880 actual engine rpm).

The
PID output is simply a number; you can imagine it as a percentage. If your idle speed was too low, this percentage would go up (and your idle valve would open). The PID output has a neutral point of 40%; i.e. if the idle speed is always correct then the PID output would always be 40%.

The
P value controls how much the PID output instantly changes in response to a difference between the target and the feedback (the error). For example, if your idle speed dropped to 700 rpm and the target was 800 rpm, then the PID output might jump from the neutral point of 40% to a new value of 50%. By doubling the P value, then the jump in PID output would also double (in this example it would jump from a neutral value of 40% to a new value of 60%).

The
I value controls how much the PID output changes in response to a long term error. If in this example the idle speed rose from 700 rpm to 750 rpm as the PID output changed from 40% to 50%, then a long term error would result, because the idle has not reached its target of 800 rpm. For this reason, the PID output will slowly climb until the target is reached. In this example, the PID output would first jump from 40% to 50% due to the P value, and then would rise to 51%, 52%, 53%, etc, until the idle speed reached 800 rpm. The I value controls how quickly this long term adjustment takes place. By doubling the I value, the rate of adjustment also doubles.

The
D value controls how the PID output changes when the error is rapidly changing. If in this example the idle speed rose rapidly when the PID output changed from 40% to 50%, then the PID output might be reduced a few percent to counteract this rapid rise. The D value has only a small influence compared to the P and I value, and is used mostly to prevent the controlled system oscillating (e.g. a hunting idle). Again, the larger the D value, the more pronounced the anti-oscillation action will be.
Consider tuning the idle speed control PID output (in most case our Preloaded maps should have preset values that should be very close):

1. First, ensure that the min and max PWM valve duties are correct (where a pwm ISC valve is used), or that the ISC steps are correct (where a stepper ISC valve is used). If in you have any concerns, contact your dealer.
A good idle is impossible unless these values are correct.

2. Set the P, I values to 50 and the D value to 0. Your idle speed will probably be too high. Next increase the P value by 20. You should notice the idle speed control system become more active. Keep increasing the P value by 20 until the idle speed becomes jumpy or hunts. Now reduce the P value by 30%. Don't worry if your idle speed is not correct. If the idle never hunts, then limit the P value to around 200.

3. Increase the I value in the same way until the idle speed becomes jumpy or hunts. Now reduce the I value by 30%. Try driving for a few days and observe the idle under different conditions.

4. If there is an excessive rpm flare after starting, reduce the I value by 10 at a time.

5. If the rpm drops out when turning the AC on, adjust the AC steps, not the P or I values.

6. If the rpm drops out after coasting then disengaging the clutch, or after free revving, then reduce the max vacuum (not the P or I values).

7. Note that when tuning for a stepper motor ISC valve, you should drive for a few minutes before adjusting any values.

The above process applies for tuning any other PID systems you may want to use.
If you have an ISC stepper motor, this is normal. The stepper motor has become de-synchronized, and will reset itself by driving. If your ISC stepper motor is a reset-by-retract type, then you may have the steps value set too low. Contact your dealer for more information.
The password is a series of characters that can be set to:

1. Prevent an inadvertent over-write of critical settings (such as triggers)
2. Prevent uploading of valuable dealer developed fuel, timing and cam control maps
3. Prevent changes to the output configuration of your Nemesis

You can check your current password status by selecting settings->setup->check status. There are 8 keys which control different protected areas. Matching keys allow/deny access to the following:

1. A settings match allows you to upload, download, and change online and offline any setting, trigger (not online) or output (collectively called a setting). A settings fail allows you to upload or change offline any setting. However, no setting (see above description) changed offline will be written to the Nemesis during a download. An attempt to change a setting online will be rejected by the Nemesis, although it will be allowed by the programming software.

2. A 3D pwm match allows you to upload, download, and change online and offline any 3D pwm map. A 3D pwm fail allows you to change online or offline any 3D pwm map. However, no 3D pwm map changed offline will be written to the Nemesis during a download. On upload, the 3D pwm maps will be substituted with zeroes to hide the stored 3D pwm maps from view (only the Nemesis itself has access to those maps).

3. An autotune match allows autotuning. An autotune fail disables the autotune function.

4. A fuel map match allows you to upload, download, and change online and offline the fuel map. A fuel map fail allows you to change offline the fuel map. Attempting to change the fuel map online will result in a checksum error. No fuel map changed offline will be written to the Nemesis during a download. On upload, the fuel map will be substituted with zeroes to hide the stored fuel map from view (only the Nemesis itself has access to those maps).

5. A spark map match, or spark map fail will result in the same spark map functionality as for the fuel map case (see above).

6. A triggers match allows you to upload, download and change offline any trigger setting. Note that number of cylinders in the settings->setup window is considered a trigger setting also. Changing a trigger setting in the triggers window online is not possible for safety reasons. A triggers fail allows you to change offline any trigger setting. However, no trigger setting changed offline will be written to the Nemesis during a download. On upload, the trigger settings will be substituted with 255 to hide the trigger settings from view.

7. A PWM axes match allows you to upload, download, change online and offline any PWM map axes variable. A PWM axes fail allows you to upload and change offline any PWM map axes variable. An attempt to change a PWM map axes variable online will be rejected by the Nemesis, although it will be allowed by the programming software. No PWM map axes variable changed offline will be written to the Nemesis during a download.

8. An outputs match or outputs fail will result in the same output configuration as for the PWM map axes variable case (see above).


Note: the details
shown in red are inconsistencies in early programming software versions. Later programming software version will not include these inconsistencies.
If you a single Nemesis user, simply upload from the Nemesis as soon as you buy it, save a master copy of the file, and always make changes from that master file or an uploaded file. The password is held in the file, and will be re-written to the Nemesis every download. On upload, the password will be uploaded; a save of an uploaded file will contain the same password. Therefore there should be no reason to ever input your password, unless you acquire a new password to unlock Nemesis features. In this case, you should open every file version you have, select settings->setup, type in the new password and hit the enter button (do this offline). Save each file. Lastly, get online with the Nemesis, and do the same. This will save the new password into the Nemesis so that next upload, the new password will uploaded.

If you share maps, then you need to enter your password (do this offline) and save on your PC before you download to your Nemesis. Technically this is not necessary to successfully download because the download protection is decided by the password stored in your Nemesis, not in the downloading file. However, if you don't do this, then you will probably find that the password that is downloaded is not correct, and the uploaded file will contain some blank areas.
Firstly, you must have a functioning NTK L2H2 UEGO O2 sensor fitted. Secondly, you must have a matching autotune password key for your Nemesis. Third, select settings->closed loop and enable closed loop, enable autotune and set wide band target table as the source of either closed loop module. Fourthly, for safety reasons the autotune works only when a PC is connected to the ECU (and is online with the ECU in the maps or data-logging window) and the DRQ pin is connected.

Now simply drive your car steadily at many different engine speeds and loads. The Nemesis is running in wideband closed loop mode, meaning that the Nemesis will alter the fuel delivery so that the measured AFR (from the L2H2) is close or equal to the AFR target table value.

At this point, the fuel map is not
necessarily correct; the AFR has simply been adjusted to the target value by the closed loop system. The Nemesis will look at 'how hard' the closed loop system is working to reach the target AFR and will make small changes to the fuel map in bring the fuel map closer to the desired fuel map. You can monitor the progress of the autotune by observing the STT (short term trim) value in the feedback panel. When this value is positive, the closed loop system is adding fuel on top of the base map value in order to reach the target AFR. When it is negative, the closed loop system is subtracting fuel. Only when the STT at a given load point is within the range +-2% can that load point be considered completely auto tuned.

To capture the changes to the fuel map,
you must upload at the end of the autotune session. Do not turn the key off until you have done this or you will lose the altered map. You may need to smoothen out any bumps in the fuel curves; the autotune will miss any load points that were not visited during the autotune session. Save this file and download.

We recommend that you remove the L1H1 at this time, and return the closed loop sensor source(s) to the appropriate narrow band sensor.
The Hydra Nemesis is capable of running individual coil on plug or wasted spark up to 8 cylinders. We recommend that the coils that you use, regardless if it is for wasted spark or individual coil on plug that they have built-in igniters. If you are running coils that do not have built-in igniters, you MUST run external igniters. We recommend that you use Bosch igniters under these conditions. The Hydra Nemesis will NOT WORK with MSD or other ignition boxes to fire the coils. Please contact us for wiring instructions to do this conversion.
We do not recommend that you use any form of ignition boxes because they can cause interference with the crank and CAM signals which can cause the car to run erratically at various RPMs. The Hydra Nemesis has complete dwell control by voltage and RPM. When the dwell is set properly, the factory coils can handle most HP needs.